Skip to main content
It looks like you're using Internet Explorer 11 or older. This website works best with modern browsers such as the latest versions of Chrome, Firefox, Safari, and Edge. If you continue with this browser, you may see unexpected results.

Open Educational Resources (OER): Introduction

This guide will provide resources to free and open education resources

History

Home / Distance Education Infographics / The History of Open Educational Resources Infographic

MERLOT and Online Teaching

Multimedia Educational Resource for Learning and Online Teaching (MERLOT) was started back in 1997 at Sonoma State University.  It is a community of staff, volunteers, and members who work together in various ways to provide users of OER (Open Educational Resource) teaching and learning materials with a wealth of services and functions that can enhance their instructional experience. You can learn more about the community by clicking on the links below

What can I do with OER?

Open content uses free license that grant users permission to:

Retain - Make, own, and control (download, duplicate, store, and manage)

Reuse - Use the content in a wide range of ways (in class, study group, website, video, anthology, in software)

Revise - Adapt, adjust, customize, or alter the content (translate, modify, reorganize, change formats)

Remix - Combine original or revised content with other material to create something new (mashup, anthology, package)

Redistribute - Share copies of the original content, your revisions or remixes (share publicly online, give a copy to a friend)

See also: Best practices for attribution of Creative Commons licensed works

This material is based on original work by David Wiley, and you can download, edit, and share the original for free under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 license from: http://www.opencontent.org/definition

 

The direct relationship between textbook costs and student success by Oregon State University is licensed under CC By NC 4.0

How to Adopt

 

Adoption Steps

Step one: Set aside time.
Searching for these materials takes time and persistence, just like research!

Step two: take a look to see if someone else has created a similar, complete OER course or textbook.
See the "Complete Courses" and "Complete Textbooks" sections of the "Find" tab.
Example: Go to the Open Textbook Library and browse their open business texts.

Step three: Get cozy with your learning objectives.
Instead of focusing on the textbook that you would like to replace, focus on what you would like students to know or be able to do. You will likely need to search for several materials to address different topics or components of your complete class.
Example: instead of searching for “biology” materials, search for “cell structure” or “DNA” or “evolution” materials.

Step four: Use Google “Advanced Search” to search for open resources.

Step five: Search within some of the specific OER repositories/OER search engines:
See the "Find" tab for a list.

*OER Pro Tip* Use the browsing tools that the repository or search engine presents to you! Don’t rely solely on keyword searching.

Step six: Look for library materials like ebooks, articles and streaming videos to fill in gaps.
Visit the library's homepage to search the collection.

Step seven: Consider creating and sharing your own OER.


Check out the 60 minute webinar “Finding and Selecting High Quality OER” below: